Replicating Paint Finish Circa 1900

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David Schubert
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Replicating Paint Finish Circa 1900

Post by David Schubert » Mon Jun 11, 2012 10:53 am

I am hoping to be at the point of having my 1900 Milwaukee ready for paint this winter and am looking for advice.

I would like the color and finish of the wooden body to be representative of factory new, neither distressed nor "Hot Rod" glossy.

Any suggestion as to how to achieve this: vendors, products, services and etc would be much appreciated.

David
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wjguthrie
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Post by wjguthrie » Tue Jun 12, 2012 12:15 pm

There are flatning agents for PPG Omni and I suppose other brands. I read a restoration article about painting a 32 ford to achive an original patina. They achived it and spent lots to do it.

I have a 1914 IHC with a wooden body. I wanted to save some of the paint that was on the truck and paint some of the bare spots. I had some Omni mixed and It didnt match. I also tried custom mix house paint with 5 levels of sheen. My color was close to red oxide. I bought Valspar paint in qts from Tractor Supply and mixed 4 parts flat red primer, 2 pts gloss red and half a part dark gloss blue. I sprayed the hood and brushed the wood frame. I used hardner on the hood. With the dull primer its still pretty glossy. Thats what I ended up with and I am happy with it. Jim
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MochetVelo
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Vintage Car Finish

Post by MochetVelo » Tue Jun 12, 2012 3:05 pm

Cars and carriages in 1900 had a high-gloss finish, In fact, a base coat/clear coat system (using enamel and varnish) was commonly used for better-quality work. I think a single-stage acrylic like Dupont Centari or a lacquer would look original. Of course, they would have originally used a brush, and this is possible with Centari, but spray is simpler.

Phil Jamison

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David Schubert
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Post by David Schubert » Wed Jun 13, 2012 6:53 am

The original sales literature listed the colors as Brewster Green with Aurora Red panels, gear, rims, and springs.

Am I correct in understanding that those names refer to different shades or colors at different times in history, and if that is correct, how do you go about getting the shade that was normative in 1900?
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MochetVelo
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Old Color Chips

Post by MochetVelo » Wed Jun 13, 2012 9:04 am

Go here for old color samples:

http://www.tcpglobal.com/autocolorlibrary/ant.html


Phil

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wjguthrie
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Post by wjguthrie » Thu Jun 14, 2012 4:55 am

Brewster green is a shade and was a Model A paint color. I'm not saying its exactly the same but it will be a dark green. Most paint dealers will not know Brewster green, they need a paint code. Even then they might say its not in my computer, I can't mix it. Here is a site with paint code cross reference database.

http://paintref.com/cgi-bin/colorcodedi ... 86&rows=50

there is a search window at the bottom of the screen. Jim
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David Schubert
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Post by David Schubert » Thu Jun 14, 2012 5:30 am

Gentlemen,

Thank you all for the information it has been most helpful.

David
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Jerry Grulkey
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Post by Jerry Grulkey » Thu Jun 28, 2012 11:31 am

Great subject I am refinishing my "Tourist" which was in great shape but had been repainted sevarl times the last was light Plymouth blue for the late 1930's movies prop. I am also using the original painting techniques and will post my methods, which to many and not all's delight as it takes very little equipment and money. Just like back then that special ability called talent. I am sick to death of the wet look and every old car is so over detailed that the even polish the block on model "A"s. I aslo wrote priciples of Autemticity for the HCCA in 1997. presented at the National Covention. I use Enamel and a badger brush. I have folks asking if the parts were NOS...and no I do use fake aging paint like they did for the most original old car aeward at Meadowbrook.
I work professionally as a color and restoration consultant and have some very early color mixing books. Brewster green was used in the carriage trade in the 19th century. The new 4cylinder model a is a little dark. So you may not want to use that formula.

Watch for my posts, .

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MochetVelo
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Brush-Painting A Car

Post by MochetVelo » Thu Jun 28, 2012 11:38 am

I'd like to see how you do it, Jerry. Some paints, like Rustoleum and POR15 for example, seem to lie flat and don't show heavy brush strokes. I've even brushed on Dupont Centari acrylic enamel, but never on a complete car. My problem on the slow-drying paints is stuff landing on the surface before it dries.


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David Schubert
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Post by David Schubert » Tue Aug 14, 2012 12:30 pm

New body is complete; it is almost a shame to cover the furniture grade woodwork with paint.

http://www2.snapfish.com/snapfish/slide ... =snapfish/
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wjguthrie
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Post by wjguthrie » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:38 am

The new body looks great. It will look awesome painted. I guess that you should seal and prime it first. The really high gloss is from clear coats or 16 coats of hand rubbed paint. Regular acrylic enamel auto paint should work out fine.
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David Schubert
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Post by David Schubert » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:46 am

When Mark at Midwest Coach and Carriage builds a body he cuts and assembles it dry then he disassembles, coats each individual piece entirely with West System epoxy, block sands each piece, and then reassembles the entire body. Once fully assembled it is given a clear lacquer protective coat for shipping.

He is great to work with and does beautiful, furniture grade, woodwork. I can't recommend him enough.

http://midwcoach.com/

David
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clarkehighwheeler
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ORIGINAL BODY FINISH

Post by clarkehighwheeler » Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:50 pm

Hello all , in contrast to some previous comments my original circa 1906 BLACK motor buggy was finished in a flat black paint with blood carmine frame and seat , also a flat finish . The colour was then covered with shelack , many coats I would assume - just like what is involved in French polishing .
Unfortunately these days , most restorers want the paint to be extremely glossy and everything bright and shinny . In many cases this was not the case .
By the same token I have seen original photos of Curved Dash Oldsmobiles with wheel reflections evident on the black body .
Cheers Clarke .

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wjguthrie
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Post by wjguthrie » Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:20 am

Clarke Thanks for posting the pictures of your Black. Its a great looking high wheeler. Jim
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clarkehighwheeler
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ORIGINAL BODY FINISH

Post by clarkehighwheeler » Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:00 am

Good on you Jim . Thanks for the kind words , best wishes , regards Clarke .

Jerry Grulkey
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Post by Jerry Grulkey » Mon Nov 26, 2012 12:39 pm

Sorry I have taken soo long to reply. While I am not posting all of the techniques (Restoring two old houses and no time for fun!) The paint I generally use is sign painters "One Shot" enamel. I lay this down in a warm garage and sometimes add a little Japan Dryer" to speed it up. (Use sparingly as it will degrade the life durabilty if too much) I let this set up for several days and when hard I bake in an oven (a insulated box with the element out of an electric oven) at about 200 dregees for several hours and it takes away some gloss but it's real hard. They make a nice maroon, black and red. I mix to vision the shades I need using various colors. The pigment is very fine and dense hence the name "One Shot" I also after baking rub it out. Have fun guys and Gals.
jerry

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Re: Replicating Paint Finish Circa 1900

Post by jjtjr » Thu Apr 04, 2013 4:12 am

Just a few notes on painting wood body. I have a copy of the 1901 Locomobile with a wood body and painted it with modern auto paint, what occurred was the paint started to check after some time. All the wood parts were prep with primer then sprayed. But because it was wood as the seasons changed the wood started to work and the checking occurred. The way I stopped this was to remove the paint and spray the bare wood with a produce that's somewhat new, its ever coat spray able poly-ester resin made for auto body work. You mix it with a hardener then you start to spray. It goes on some what heavy, after it cures you can sand it to paint. This worked great no more checking.
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MochetVelo
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Re: Replicating Paint Finish Circa 1900

Post by MochetVelo » Thu Apr 04, 2013 5:16 am

Several restoration shops I know use a thin epoxy on the bare wood, followed by the primer and finish coats. The epoxy (West System is popular) is brushed on and then dry-sanded smooth. This seals the wood.


Phil Jamison

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