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torgue

Posted: Thu Jan 15, 2015 3:07 pm
by Charliechalmers13
Looking for info on how tight to torque end caps on con rods on engine, 1913 Chalmers 17

Re: torgue

Posted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 6:39 pm
by MochetVelo
Of course, they didn't use torque settings in the brass era, but Model T rod bolts are set today at 35 ft lbs. Perhaps they are similar dimensionally to yours.

Phil

Re: torgue

Posted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 7:02 pm
by JV Puleo
The optimum torque is a function of the diameter of the bolt, the threads and the material they are made of. Are these the original bolts? If so, the number will be lower because they are generally quite soft. If modern, high strength bolts it will be easier to find the correct number (and I wouldn't put an engine back together with the original cap bolts). I don't know what a Chalmers rod looks like but I'd guess its much stouter than a Model T Ford and thus can take more torque. An on-line search will probably find a torque chart. I would stay 10 or 15 lbs under the maximum to avoid stretching the bolts and be sure to put the cotter pins back in.

Here is an example of a torque spec chart:
http://raskcycle.com/techtip/webdoc14.html

If using original bolts, you have to presume they are of the lowest grade...

Re: torgue

Posted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 8:18 pm
by MochetVelo
I would suggest you install new bolts and nuts on your rods rather than re-torquing the originals.


Phil

Re: torgue

Posted: Thu Feb 05, 2015 7:11 pm
by Charliechalmers13
Hi and thank you for the comments. I've been away so only now getting back to it. Chalmers has 4 bolts per cap, quite substantial looking, so perhaps a lower torque? I'm using the originals as everything else on the car is-as-was when new.

Charlie

Sorry Charlie.

Posted: Sun Feb 08, 2015 10:53 pm
by jeff deringer
Seems to me that you are in a way over your head. I've followed this thread, and there are all kinds of necessary questions brought up, like bolt diameter, grade, stretch, etc. You've got a great car. Take this in the best way possible. Perhaps you should look for an experienced antique car engine builder. Nothing would suck more than finishing such a great car and then experiencing a catastrophic engine failure.

Just my $.02. It's a free country.